Posts Tagged ‘breed’

  • Homemade Bunny Treats

    Following along with the two previous homemade treat blogs, we’re now moving on to the small animal world! Not everyone has a dog or cat, bunnies need love too! And the best way to show them you care is by homemaking treats for them. This can be a great activity for the whole family to spend time together and showing love to their animals. We hope you (and your pets!) enjoy this list of homemade small animal treats!

    Banana Oatmeal Carrot Granola Treats:

    Ingredients:

    5 cm ripe banana

    5 cm carrot, shredded

    1 pandan leaf, cut into strips

    3 tbsp instant oatmeal

    Directions:

    1. Mush the banana into purée. Add in the shredded carrot and pandan leaves
    2. Add in the instant oatmeal and mix into a dough
    3. Take a small teaspoon of the dough, press hard into a ball shape.
    4. Shape the dough into a bowl shape. The shape allows the rabbit to bite on its own without having us to hold on to the snack.
    5. Lay the small doughs onto a baking sheet lined with non-stick baking paper.
    6. Bake the doughs in an oven set at 300 degrees for 30 minutes. Then allow the snack to cool down in the oven for at least 1 hour to allow most of the moisture to escape.
    7. Store the cool down biscuits in an air-tight container. Give your rabbits one or two biscuits per day!

    Via: http://mymindpatch.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/banana-oatmeal-carrot-granola-for-rabbit.html?m=1

    Special Bunny Cookies:

    Ingredients:

    ¼ cup mashed banana

    1 tsp honey

    ¼ cup pureed pumpkin

    ¼ cup ground pellets

    ¼ cup ground oats

    Directions:

    1. Gather and mix all ingredients together
    2. Roll out to ¼ inch thickness
    3. Cut dough out into cute shapes and bake for 30 minutes at 325 degrees
    4. Turn off oven, but let cookies dry in warm oven for another hour
    5. Let cool completely, then give 1-2 cookies per day

    Via: http://www.thebunnyhut101.com/2014/01/bunny-cookies.html

    Bunny Cilantro Squares:

    Ingredients:

    1 Banana

    1/2 c. Pineapple, crushed (Do not drain juice. If you are using canned pineapple, make sure it is just pineapple in juice. Do not use pineapple in syrup.)

    2 c. Cilantro, chopped

    1 c. Rabbit pellets

    1 c. Oats

    Directions:

    1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
    2. Puree banana, cilantro and pineapple until consistency is smooth.
    3. Grind oats and pellets into a powder (a clean coffee grinder works best for this).
    4. Mix the puree, oats and pellets together in a large bowl, and knead the dough until it is stiff enough to form a ball. Divide the dough in half, and place on baking sheets or stones, and roll to about 1/8th of an inch thick. Hint: When you are rolling out the dough, put plastic wrap over it. This will prevent the dough from sticking to your rolling pin.
    5. Cut the sheets of dough into small squares (a pizza cutter works well).
    6. Bake for 30-35 minutes. Be careful not to brown them too much, especially if you are using baking sheets (metal sheets brown faster than stones).
    7. Turn the oven off and let the treats sit in the warm oven for several hours to dry out and harden the treats
    8. Let cool completely before giving them to your bunny and store in an air-tight container
    9. Only give these occasionally, as they are loaded with sugar!

    Via: http://www.amysedarisrocks.com/simpletimes/simple-times-crafts/

    Another good idea for very simple treats is putting your bunny’s favorite fruits and veggies, cut up, in ice trays with just enough water to bind the chunks together and freezing overnight. Viola, instant cooling treats for your small animal!

  • Fall Is Just Around the Corner…Time for All Pumpkin Everything, but Mainly Homemade Dog Treats!

    I know, I know! We are about to be inundated with pumpkin spice as fall is about to be within our grasp, but I just couldn’t help myself! Pumpkin makes such a good ingredient for homemade dog treats as it is very easy on sensitive tummies and is scrumptious for our furry friends! Take a moment to treat your pups today!

    Pumpkin Peanut Butter Oatmeal Dog Biscuits:

    Ingredients:

    3 cups oats

    ½ cup peanut butter

    1 cup pumpkin puree

    1 teaspoon cinnamon

    1 teaspoon baking powder

    2 eggs

    Instructions:

    1. Place the oatmeal into a food processor and pulse it until it’s not so coarse, but it doesn’t need to be a fine as flour.
    2. Add oatmeal, pumpkin, peanut butter cinnamon baking powder and eggs to bowl on mixer and blend on medium until it’s all mixed.
    3. Roll out with a little flour and cut with cookie cutters.
    4. Bake at 375 degrees for 15-20 minutes.
    5. Cool on rack until completely cooled.
    6. Place in airtight container to keep them fresh, or in the freezer. I keep them in the freezer, they don’t freeze solid as there is little liquid.

    Via: http://www.createdby-diane.com/2012/10/pumpkin-peanut-butter-oatmeal-dog-biscuits.html

    Blueberry Pumpkin Dog Treats:

    Ingredients:

    1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce

    1/2 cup canned pumpkin puree (not pie filling)

    2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour

    1/2 cup ground pumpkin seeds (unsalted)

    1/3 cup blueberries

    * Water as needed

    Directions:

    1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F.
    2. In a blender or food processor, grind the pumpkin seed finely. Empty grounds into bowl, and then add blueberries. Grind to a pulp.
    3. Blend together the applesauce, pumpkin and blueberries. Once the applesauce and pumpkin are well combined, stir in the flour and pumpkin seed meal. Knead into a stiff dough, add water if necessary.
    4. Roll out on a floured surface to 1/2 inch thickness and cut with cookie cutters.
    5. Place on parchment paper lined cookie sheets.
    6. Bake for 30 minutes and let cool. Refrigerate or freeze in Ziploc bags or airtight containers

    Via: http://www.petguide.com/health/dog/beautiful-blueberry-and-pumpkin-dog-treat-recipe/

    Pumpkin Yogurt Easy Frozen Dog Treats Recipe:

    Ingredients:

    100% Pure Pumpkin

    Plain Greek Yogurt

    Banana

    Supplies:

    Silicone Mold

    Directions:

    1. Slice a banana into thin slices
    2. Layer each section of the mold with pumpkin, yogurt and tip with a banana slice
    3. Tap the mold on the counter to try and eliminate any air bubbles and then press down on the banana slice to push the ingredients into the mold
    4. Freeze overnight
    5. Pop the treats out of the mold and serve to very happy pups! You can store in the freezer for up to a week.

    Via: http://amagicalmess.com/2016/08/yogurt-frozen-dog-treats-recipe.html

    Pumpkin & Molasses Dog Cookies:

    Ingredients:

    ½ cup organic canned pumpkin

    4 tablespoons molasses

    4 tablespoons water

    2 tablespoons vegetable oil

    2 cups whole wheat flour

    ¼ teaspoon baking soda

    ¼ teaspoon baking powder

    Instructions:

    1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
    2. In a large bowl mix the pumpkin, molasses, vegetable oil, and water.
    3. In a separate, medium bowl combine whole wheat flour, baking soda, and baking powder. Slowly stir dry ingredients into the wet ingredients until the dough softens.
    4. Scoop out small spoonful’s of dough {about 1 inch wide} and roll them into balls with your hands.
    5. Set the balls onto a lightly greased cookie sheet and flatten them with a fork.
    6. Bake for 20 minutes
    7. Store in the refrigerator for up to 2 months

    Via: http://betsylife.com/easy-homemade-dog-treats/#_a5y_p=4440262

     

  • 5 Important Things to Teach Your New Pup

    Bringing home a new dog is a huge responsibility, no matter how old they are. One of the most important things you can do is ensuring your dog develops the behavioral, social, and physical skills needed to live a good life in our world!

    How you train your dog can dramatically shape their personality and future. At Petland, we’re huge fans of training our dogs through positive reinforcement using any of the scrumptious training treats we carry in our store.

    In order to make sure you’re setting your tail-wagger up for success, here’s a checklist of 5 crucial training and behavioral tips using dog treats to get you started.

    1. Basic commands

    Sit, Stay, Come, Leave It: These are the golden commands that can make your life so much easier. “Sit” and “Stay” help teach your dog patience and these two commands come in handy when you know you’re dog is in a state of excitement. “Come” is one of those commands that will help you get their attention and serves as a good command when you need to distract your dog from what they’re doing. “Leave it” is best used for when they fixate on something, whether it’s destroying your shoe or trying to steal a treat off the streets.

    2. Learning about their space in your home

    It’s important for your dog to love their bed/crate and know that that’s their space to claim. Having consistent spots in the house helps them feel secure since they have a natural instinct to den. Some dogs take to this more naturally while others need more coaxing, especially if it’s a crate or a bed placed in a spot of the house that’s not their favorite. The best way to get them to like their nook is to reward them with a treat when they are in the bed/crate. Soon enough they’ll begin to develop a positive association with the area and automatically go their designated spots!

    3. Teaching them about boundaries

    Dogs respond well to boundaries as long as they have been clearly defined. If your dog isn’t allowed to chew shoes, make sure you say a stern “No” and swap the shoe for one of their toys so they know what’s acceptable. Similarly if your dog isn’t allowed on the couch, gently push them off and when they stay down, reward them with a tasty treat and tons of praise. But make sure you stick to these rules. If you allow them on the couch sometimes and don’t at other times, it’ll confuse your dog and make it harder for them to know what’s ok and what’s not.

    4. Go Potty

    Older adopted dogs, are usually house-broken but that doesn’t mean that they won’t have accidents while they try and get used to their new environment. The best way to train a puppy or dog to go potty in the right places is to deliberately walk to the spot when you know they need to go and when they do go reward them with praise and treats. By constantly reinforcing the behavior you’ll be able to get them on a steady routine where both you and the pup know when it’s time to go!

    5. Teaching them to be ok with being home alone.

     If you’ve managed to train your pup to like their crate then leaving them home shouldn’t be too difficult. But for those of you who don’t crate, the best way to get your pup to not worry when you leave is to stagger the amount of time you’re gone and reinforce the good behavior with treats. First you can start by leaving them for 5 minutes. Come back and reward them if they don’t howl. Gradually increase the amount of time you’re gone. With some patience and time your dog will eventually learn that when you leave it doesn’t mean you’ll never come back. This a great way to also build trust between you and your dog. Once they start to trust they’ll be more at ease.

    Here at Petland, dog training is a big part of our everyday lives. We specialize in helping customers with tips and tricks for all sorts of training concerns and questions. We also send each of our new puppies home with training sessions in our store with the option for in-home training as well from the training company we work with. Having a solid foundation of training, no matter how old your four-legged family member is, will not only make you happy, but your pet as well! We also stock everything you would need for successful training from treats to crates, correction collars and so much more! Swing by and let us help you today!

     

     

  • 4 Training Mistakes You Could Be Unintentionally Making with Your Pooch!

    There are several things we as puppy parents unintentionally do that mess with our dogs’ emotions. No matter how hard we try in our effort to be perfect, some of our human ways can lead to one confused pup. And sending mixed signals to our pups will make them more likely to misbehave. But is it really bad behavior, or just bad communication?

    1. “COME HERE NOW!”

    How many of you have called to your dog and a wild west standoff ensues? Well, what exactly are you calling them for? We often expect our pups to come even when they know there’s no incentive to do so. Instead, ensure that “come” works every time by rewarding your dog with a puppy party every time they obey this all-important command. The key-word here is reward. Puppy parties should involve anything your dog finds rewarding–a nice belly rub, a yummy treat, their favorite toy, etc. Never punish your dog for coming when called. Even if your dog is coming back after an hour-long escapade through the neighborhood, they still get a puppy party. Remember to always issue a recall command with a pleasant tone and a smile on your face; no dog wants to come running to an angry tone and a scowling face.

    2. Back Talk

    Petting, talking to, playing with, and even scolding a barking dog, reinforces the dog to bark. Do not give a dog attention while they’re barking. The best remedy to a Barking Betsy is the good ole’ cold shoulder. And don’t forget to praise the peace and reward Betsy when she is being quiet! Remember, barking can be inherently rewarding for some dogs, especially for many smaller breeds. Make sure the reward you give your dog is more rewarding then the barking itself. You may have to test out several treats and toys to find out what your pup goes absolutely bananas for.

    3. Chew On This, Not That!

    Dogs don’t just have a desire to chew, they have a need to chew! Providing your dog with plenty of chew toys is the first step, but unfortunately not the last. Dogs need constant reminding of what is okay to chew and what isn’t. Keep anything you don’t want your dog to chew off the floor! If you do catch your dog chewing on something off-limits, redirect him with a few cues (sit, down, touch), and then replace the item with one of their chew toys.

    4. Nipping Enabler

    Mouthy puppies can be sweet and funny when they are little, but nipping can become dangerous fast. Don’t allow your dog to make teeth-to-skin contact with anyone, ever. When dogs first learn how to play, their litter mates and mother teach them what an acceptable mouthing pressure is, and what kind of wrestling is tolerated among other dogs. As a puppy parent, it is your job to teach your dog the appropriate way to play with humans. Even if it’s a playful accident, let your dog know that nipping isn’t okay by exclaiming “OUCH!” and by walking away. Don’t play with your pup for fifteen to thirty seconds. Your dog will soon figure out that if they don’t play appropriately, the game will end.

    We hope this blog was helpful to any who might be making some training missteps and not even realizing it! At Petland, we also pride ourselves on being a fount of information when it comes to properly training a new puppy as well as continuing that training into doggy adulthood! Stop in today if you’ve got a training issue to tackle, we’ve got the knowledge, treats and toys to help you on your way to becoming a better pet parent!

     

  • 5 Popular Pet Rabbit Breeds for Families

    I know sometimes it seems like we focus on puppies (because they’re just so darn cute!), but on these next two blog posts I want to really dive into the world of owning a different kind of four-legged furry friend…the bunny rabbit! First, we are going to go over the different breeds that we carry at Petland and which one might be best for your family! Here we go:

    Mini Rex

    As a miniature version of the Rex rabbit, the Mini Rex has risen in popularity. With a sweet personality, and fur described as “living velvet,” the Mini Rex makes a great pet. Its famous fur is dense, plush and very soft to the touch. Colors include black, gray, brown or white. The pattern could also be splotched, or one solidly colored fur.

    Lionhead Rabbit

    Lionhead rabbits are small and fluffy, reaching only about 4 pounds in weight. Their petite size and soft fur make them a popular choice as a “pocket pet.” They are aptly named due to the lionlike manes that surround their faces. Lionhead rabbits can have either a single or double mane, with the double mane extending to a long, wool skirt around the rear. These rabbits have a gentle disposition, and are willing to play. They can be skittish, but handling from an early age should counteract that.

    English Lop

    The English lop is instantly recognizable from its very long, floppy ears. Similar to its droopy ears, its body is long and lean. It is one of the oldest breeds of domesticated rabbits, and the first lop rabbit developed by humans. Its pleasant and playful disposition make the English lop a popular choice for a pet rabbit. It enjoys playing and exploring, but can be easily startled. Care should be taken when handling this breed.

    Dutch Rabbit

    Dutch rabbits, native to Holland, are one of the oldest domesticated rabbit breeds. They are also a common sight in rabbit shows. This breed is distinguished by its white fur on the face, shoulders, neck and feet. The remaining fur could be black, brown, blue or tortoiseshell in color. Their serene and laid-back personalities make them a great pet choice for children at least 10 years old. This breed thrives on human interaction, so playing with them should be a daily activity.

    Netherland Dwarf Rabbit

    The Netherland dwarf rabbit is one of the smallest rabbit breeds. Their fur ranges in color and patterns, and they normally weigh around 2 pounds. They have extremely short ears and short fur coats. This breed is another one seen in rabbit shows, but it also makes an excellent choice for a family pet. They are happiest in pairs, so two are better than one in the case of Netherland dwarf rabbits.

     

  • 8 Dog Breeds That Are Overwhelmingly Affectionate

    Some pups like their space. Other pups like YOUR space.

    For those who loooooove the latter, here, in no particular order and based off personality characteristics are the 8 breeds most likely to give you some serious PDA!

    1. Labrador Retriever – Born to please, it’s a wonder these friendly pups don’t give their hoomans a cavity, they’re so sweet. Plus, everyone knows a happy Lab’s tail-wagging is the best mood booster ever (and also great at clearing small objects off low desks…chairs…tables…).
    2. Golden Retriever – Goldens are big, friendly lugs. Popular with families all over, their lovability and affection for their pup parents are the stuff of Hollywood. You doubt? One word: SHADOW.
    3. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel – Steadfast lovebug companions to humans as far back as Britain’s King Charles II’s reign, these pups are always up for super snuggle time!
    4. Brussels Griffon – They’re called Velcro dogs. Please. You can’t GET these scruffy little fuzz-butts to stop showering you with affection!
    5. Old English Sheepdog – You can’t look at these pups and not want to give ’em a hug! Good thing they’re all about the love. They’re especially great with kids (though sometimes, they might try to herd them).
    6. Chihuahua – These funny little cuddle bugs fave place: Right by their humans! Good thing they’re portable. Chihuahuas can sometimes be wary of strangers, but if you’re their human, you’re THEIR human (and they wouldn’t have it any other way!).
    7. Great Dane – They’re lap dogs that just don’t care your lap is way, way, waaaaaaay too small for them.
    8. English Bulldog – Slobbery, farty, snoring bundles of wrinkebutt cuddles, the English Bulldog does everything 110%, including adoring their hoomans!

    Here at Petland, we have the breeds you want if you’re interested in your own little snuggle bug! We also have everything you need to spoil your little four-legged family member, since they already shower you with love!

  • 5 Reasons Why Your Dog Loves to Destroy Their Toys!

    We’ve all seen the “dog shaming” photos on social media, showcasing the destruction caused by our loving canines who tore apart their precious toys. Do you ever leave your house only to come back later to a disaster, with your dog sitting idly by as if nothing happened? How about giving your dog toys, and they tear them apart in seconds?

    It’s no secret that dogs love their toys, but even so they manage to destroy them. But the behavior is perfectly natural, since your dogs don’t really see toys as toys. For your pup, a brand new, perfectly intact toy is nothing other than a vessel for their primal instincts!

    So here are 5 reasons your K9 counterparts love to destroy their toys:

    1. Boredom: For one, boredom! Dogs get bored, and when they do, they need to entertain themselves, and sometimes, it’s not in a way that you’ll appreciate.

    2. We Trained Them To: Another reason is we taught them to destroy things. When you get a puppy, the way they aggressively go after their toys is adorable to us, so without knowing it, we tend to encourage it, and this leads to them to continue on the path to destruction.

    3. They Get The Toy Whenever They Want: A dog that can get at his toys all of the time will eventually tear them apart. I mean, what do you really expect? It should instead be a reward rather than something enjoyable that they just get to have because they’re the best and we love them.

    4. Lack of Mental and Physical Stimulation: Similar to boredom, if play time isn’t interactive enough or doesn’t burn enough energy. You need to have toys for your dog that make them use their mind, they like to think, and they suffer when you don’t stimulate their brain. Similar to this, if you’re not exercising them, they’re going to find something to get rid of that extra energy.

    5. You Have A Heavy Chewer: Don’t be fooled by your dog’s size, even if they’re little, they can still chew with the best of them. A Chihuahua isn’t necessarily going to be happy with a plush, he might need a hard strong toy too! Get toys that work with your dog’s personality, and give them toys that work with their chew style.

    No matter what causes you dog to chew so aggressively, here at Petland we have all the replacement toys you can possibly imagine! Whether your dog prefers plush or rubber or rope we have what you need to occupy your pooch so they don’t start looking for the next best thing to their toys, which might include a very expensive shoe or piece of furniture. It is also a good idea to have plenty of toys in rotation, so they’re not so available to your dog and seem new when you hand them over. Sop by the store today and we can help you find the perfect toy (or toys!) for your pet today!

     

  • Are You and Your Pooch Good Neighbors? Check Out These 5 Tips for Making Sure!

    Sure, you and your dog are perfect housemates. You give Fido food, and the pooch gives you snuggles. Sounds like it all works out. But are you and your pup good neighbors? If you’re not sure if the folks on your block would say yes, then check out this list and see if you do these things.

    1. “No poop left behind” should be your mantra.
    Never ever leave your dog poop just lying around, like little smelly minefields waiting to find shoe victims. Not only is it bad for the environment, but not cleaning up after your dog is just a crappy thing to do and sure to get you on your neighbor’s naughty list.

    2. Teach your pooch some manners!
    You’re bound to pass some people on your walk who love your dog and want to say hi. But not everyone does (though we don’t understand why). Teach your dog not to bark, growl, jump on, or hump passersby. Consider an obedience school. A little training goes a long way.

    3. Stay in bounds.
    For the love of dog, don’t let your canine roam the neighborhood. Also, if you use a retractable leash, don’t let your dog get too far from you. It will be harder to properly supervise if Fido isn’t nearby.

    4. Keep the peace.
    There could be a lot of reasons why your dog barks all day, but none of them are going to please your neighborhood when they have to listen to it. Assess the situation and act accordingly. If you have a high-energy dog, you might need to take longer walks or hire someone to walk the dog walk you’re away. If your pooch has separation anxiety, talk to your vet and trainer about the best way to handle the situation. Consider a doggy daycare.

    5. Introduce yourself and your pooch.
    When you make an introduction, you’ll be able to find out how your neighbor feels about dogs and if they have any concerns. And should your dog ever escape, you’ll have another set of eyes in the neighborhood. Assure your neighbor they can come to you at any time with concerns.

    Don’t forget that Petland works with the best dog training companies around! If your pooch needs a little extra (or a lot extra!) training to keep you in your neighbors good graces, never hesitate to stop by and let us give you tips or refer a trainer. We also carry a ton of training treats or toys to keep your pet occupied while you’re away, we’ve got what you need! Good luck, and may your neighbors give your pooch lots of belly rubs!

  • Summer Bathing, Are You Doing It Right?

    For most of us, taking a shower or bath is usually a calming experience. For our pets, however, bathing may be anything but relaxing. Between the water, the noise, the confinement, the scrubbing and the suds, it’s no wonder why your cat or dog may sprint in the other direction of the tub. Unfortunately, grooming our pets is a necessary evil. It minimizes shedding, keeps your pet’s coat healthy, reduces allergies, decreases chances of infection and diminishes the spread of dirt and germs throughout your home. While your dog or cat may never willingly jump under the faucet, you can make bath time as positive, easy and fast an experience as possible by avoiding these common mistakes:

    Wrong Water Temperature
    Shoot for lukewarm water, says Jocelyn Robles, a professional groomer at Holiday House Pet Resort, a veterinarian-owned pet resort and training center in Doylestown, Pa. Water that’s too hot or too cold will create a negative stimulus for your pet, which may turn them off of bath time for the long haul. So how do you know it’s the right temperature? Spray the nozzle on your forearm first, just like you would if you were giving a baby a bath, Robles says. The area of skin is more sensitive to temperature than your hands.

    Harsh Spray
    The easiest way to bathe your cat or dog is with a handheld shower head or faucet nozzle in a tub or sink (if you have one, there’s no need to fill the tub or sink with water when you bathe your pet), but the sound of the loud running water combined with the water pressure may frighten and upset your pet. Instead of spraying the water jet straight on to his fur, try to keep your pet calm by letting the water hit the back of your hand first as you move the nozzle across your pet’s body, Robles says. Your dog or cat will feel your comforting touch as opposed to the pounding of the water. Once he is at ease, you can move your hand away—just make sure you get his entire coat wet.

    Wrong Shampoo Selection
    Don’t automatically grab your own shampoo—even if it’s an “all-natural” solution or a mild baby shampoo, Robles says. “A pet’s skin has a different pH balance than humans,” she added. “Your shampoo will be drying to them.” Your veterinarian can help you with product recommendations, but you’ll generally want to look for brands that are specifically formulated for cats or dogs and follow the directions for shampooing on the label. Oatmeal-based shampoos are a gentle option. Medicated shampoos are an essential part of treating many skin conditions. Ask your veterinarian which might be right for your dog or cat. If your pet has sensitive skin, test the shampoo on a patch on the back of his leg first, and then look for any signs of irritation a couple days before a bath.

    Poor Soap Application
    You may want to apply soap to your pet’s fur and then let it “soak in” for a couple minutes, but you won’t remove all the dirt and oil that way, Robles says. You need to agitate the shampoo to trap the grime and wash it away. Actively massage the soap into your dog or cat’s fur with your hands and fingers for four minutes. Start with your pet’s legs and work your way up to his face (the most sensitive area), Robles says. Clean his face with a cotton ball or washcloth and be careful to avoid his eyes. Wash the outside of his ears with a tiny bit of shampoo on your fingers, a washcloth or a cotton ball. Tilt your pet’s head down before rinsing (for instance, if you’re washing his left ear, angle the left side of his head down) to keep water from going into the ear canal and to prevent ear infections, Robles says. Pay extra attention to your pet’s paw pads, too, as these areas can sweat and trap odor. Then rinse away the shampoo with the shower nozzle, reversing the order in which you shampooed. Start with your pet’s head this time and then work your way down to his legs. That way, if any soap got in your pet’s eyes, they’ll be rinsed first. Make sure the water runs clear of suds before you finish.

    Bad Brushing Technique
    You should brush your dog or cat before and after a bath, but only if you regularly brush him at least three times a week, Robles says. Brushing can be painful and uncomfortable if there are matts or knots in your pet’s fur. “This can turn grooming into a negative,” she says. “You can’t just brush them out.” If your dog or cat has tangled fur, take him to a professional groomer first, then start a regular brushing routine. This will not only keep your pet’s coat shinier and tangle-free, but also keep him cleaner between baths. For breeds with double coats that shed (such as Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherds), you can brush your pet while he is shampooed to help remove some of the excess undercoat, but for all other breeds, make sure your pet is as dry as possible after the bath and before brushing, Robles said. If his fur is too saturated with water, you’ll only create mats. You can even wait until the next day to brush. A slicker brush and/or long-tooth comb will work best for most breeds. Some de-shedding tools and undercoat rakes have been known to knick the skin and cause infections, so double check all tools with a professional groomer or veterinarian you trust before using them, Robles says. A groomer will also be able to demonstrate the proper way to brush your pet from head to paw.

    Hasty Drying Technique
    Make sure you have towels ready to go before the bath (the last thing you want is a soaking wet pet sprinting through your home!) and, if you own a dog, have a few towels on the floor and one ready to drape over his back in case he wants to shake off during the bath. After a bath most pet owners quickly towel down their pet, but you should try to get the fur as dry as possible, Robles says. Use a towel to gently squeeze the fur and pull out as much water as possible, she said. By the end, your pet should be damp but not dripping wet. You’ll want to leave using a blow dryer or any other type of drying tool to the professional groomer, Robles says. It’s difficult to regulate the temperature of the airflow, which increases the risk of burning your pet’s skin. Plus, most animals are scared of the noise, which may put a damper on the end of an otherwise positive bath time experience.

    Bathing Too Often
    Dogs and cats naturally groom themselves, so you probably don’t need to bathe your pet more than once a month, Robles says. Too many baths can actually strip away the natural oils in your pet’s coat and cause skin irritation. Speak with your veterinarian to determine the best grooming schedule and best type of shampoo for your pet’s breed and activity level.

    Here at Petland, we have a wide variety of shampoos, conditioners, spritzes and grooming tools to help you help your pet happy and healthy this summer! Stop by today!

  • What to do When Your Dog Just. Won’t. Go.

    We’ve all had those mornings. You know the ones – the alarm didn’t go off, your hot water took forever to heat up, you couldn’t find those pants you wanted to wear today and all of a sudden you’re soooo late and all you need is for your dog to stop sniffing around outside and go to the bathroom! Yeah, like I said, we’ve all had one of those. Well, hopefully the tips below will help your pooch get down to business when you need him to. But there’s nothing you can do about the dreaded “nothing goes your way” days!

    1. Make sure your pup’s reluctance to go potty is not a sign of a medical condition. Dogs are smart. They often figure out that once they poop, the walk’s over. But before you accuse your pup of being a manipulative little genius, find out if they’re holding it in because of something more serious. Urinary tract infections are a common cause of urinary retention, and constipation might be stopping up your dog’s bowels. Get the opinion of a trusted vet before you trying any of the methods below.

    2. Find a quiet area and make it a habitual potty spot. Like us, pups prefer to go #1 and #2 in peace. Your dog might be uneasy relieving himself in an area with lots going on. It’s kind of like when you go to the bathroom and someone talks to you through the door and suddenly find yourself with a weird case of bathroom stage fright.

    3. Tummy massage. Never underestimate the power of a gentle tummy rub. Your pup will think he’s just getting a normal belly rub for being a good pup, but soft clockwise motions might help get things moving, if you know what I mean.

    4. Use a command. Most people use “Go poop,” but feel free to get creative. I have also heard of people who say, “Do your business” and “Go potty.” The important thing is that your pup knows it’s go time when you say the magic words so you’re not walking up and down the same street for an entire hour because your pooch thinks you’re just going for a normal walk.

    5. Get that cute booty moving! When housetraining, owners are advised to take their pup outside or to a fresh puppy pad immediately after playtime, because all that horsing around encourages your pup to let loose! Taking a quick jog around the neighborhood or playing a game of fetch might be just what your dog needs to finally go.

    We hope that these tips will be effective the next your pup needs to hurry things along because you need to get out the door! Let us know any tips or tricks that you might have for “potty time” with your puppy, we are always looking for good advice to pass along! Thanks for being a loyal reader of our blogs!

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